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Posts tagged ‘savings tips for Canadians’

How Single Moms Can Stave Off Mental Illness

Depressed woman

Being a single mom can be difficult. ReadersDigest is looking out for you and has some helpful advice in this article!

A recent study based on the Canadian Community Health Survey by Dr. John Cairney, associate professor of family medicine at McMaster University, revealed that the rate of mental illness (such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder) for single mothers was three times higher than that for married mothers.

This group’s higher rates of mental illness aren’t necessarily the result of being single. (Single mothers are, after all, a diverse group encompassing teens, divorced or never-married women and single professionals, so experiences vary.) Rather, the increased rates are a result of specific factors, including economic hardship, caregiver stress and lack of community support. But help is often available to manage or mitigate these issues.

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Top 10 Personal Finance Tips for Single Parents

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Being a single parent isn’t easy, but it can be easier. Lifehack.org provides a great article with tips to improve your financial situation.

The economy always works in cycles, and with these cycles our perceptions about money, how we should deal with it, and what our responsibilities are towards accurately informing our children about it also change.

A March 2012 survey suggests that more parents are talking with their kids regarding money. Parents are discussing with children what they need to understand about it in order to make more informed choices on money matters as they grow older.

The current generation of students, or those who are in the initial years of their careers, are deep in student debt. I believe that one can avoid student debt if parents play their finances a bit more safely and carefully craft the financial future of their kids. Parents, though, can sometimes be poor role models when it comes to managing money and teaching the same to their kids. However, even if you are a single parent with limited means, it is still possible to take stock of things and enforce good financial discipline to achieve a secure financial future for your whole family.

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Get Control of Your Kid Stuff with Consignment Stores

Your kids can be expensive. Especially with clothing because they grow up too darn fast. Thankfully, SimplyFrugal.ca has a handy article with some tips to keep kid costs down.

As a Mom of six kids, I rely on hand-me downs to stretch my budget. But sometimes an item doesnʼt get “worn out” enough by the time the last child has outgrown it.  And what about the oldest — where can I get hand-me-downs for her?  The solution: childrenʼs consignment stores!

Consignment stores are gold mines for the de-cluttering Mom.  Buy and sell all types of childrenʼs gear: clothing, toys, footwear, swings, strollers, high chairs, books, tapes — in other words, the works. They are an fantastic place to get barely used childrenʼs clothes, often with the tags still on, for a fraction of the price.

Consignment stores work by selling gently used items for you, and keeping a portion of the price (usually around half.) Unlike thrift stores, they pre-screen and organize all the merchandise into a shopper friendly format, making them a super go-to resource for the frugal parent.

Here are some tips to make your consignment shopping and selling, something youʼll be doing again and again.

Research your Store’s Policies

Before you bring your items in, either phone or drop by to see what your local storeʼs policies are. For some stores you need an appointment, and others are drop in. Find out if they pay you up front for the items they take, or after they sell. Most stores have a limit on the amount you can bring in at one time, and the type of items they will take, so check ahead to avoid aggravation and a wasted trip. (more…)

How to Dine Out Without Breaking the Bank

Tomorrow is Friday. But not just any old regular Friday.  Its a Valentines Day Friday! So before you take your special someone out for dinner, Yahoo Finance has a few great tips on how to save yourself a few bucks!

How to Dine Out Without Breaking the Bank

Eating in restaurants can be expensive. It’s estimated that each American spends on average $2,620 a year eating out. Roughly 93% of consumers enjoy eating out and the restaurant industry holds 47% of the share of food dollar expenditures. Instead of spending thousands of dollars eating out at restaurants each year, try these tips that will not only allow you to dine out at restaurants, but will save you money as well.

1. Time of Day If you are looking to try out the newest restaurant in town, try going for lunch instead of dinner. Dining in off-peak hours can save you money while still allowing you to try fabulous new dishes. There are even apps for your mobile device, such as “Savored,” that advertise the discounts restaurants are offering during off-peak hours. Another time to look at going to restaurants is during happy hour. Not only do some restaurants offer buy-one-get-one-free deals on beverages, they also typically have specials on appetizers. (more…)

Highlights From Finance Minister Flaherty’s 2014 Federal Budget

 Hey everyone! Courtesy of the Canadian Press here are some highlights from Canada’s 2014 budget announcement by Jim Flaherty! I bolded some areas of interest at the civilian level!
Not listed: Commitment to 5mbps internet speeds across Canada. Good news for all you members of rural Canada and people with lower end internet packages!

Some highlights from Finance Minister Jim Flaherty’s 2014 federal budget

OTTAWA – Some highlights of the federal budget delivered Tuesday by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty:

— The budget is close to balance, with a $2.9-billion deficit and a $3-billion contingency fund.

— Flaherty forecasts revenues of $276.3 billion and expenditures of $279.2 billion.

— The government makes clear it will balance the budget next year by cutting program spending and reining in public service compensation costs.

— The budget proposes to make retired federal public servants pay half the costs of their health-care plan, up from a quarter now. This would raise annual payments for a retired individual to $550 from $261. (more…)

Three Personal Finance Tips For Soon To Be College Graduates

Scott Day of Michigan State University has 3 great finance tips for upcoming grads!

I just recently bumped into an old friend that I had not seen in a while. He has a “soon-to-be college graduate.”  We started talking about today’s tough job market, and he asked if I have any advice that I might be able to pass on in personal finances for this particular age demographic. I quickly put together a three-point elevator speech that could be explained by a concerned parent in a short period of time, and here are the highlights:

  1. Next time your soon-to-be graduate is at a book store getting a cup of coffee, meeting with a group of friends or studying, ask them to pick up a book or two on personal finances that is directed at their age. If they can buy it, great, but even if they skim through it for a half hour at a time, over time, this will get the ball rolling that will help them set themselves up or success in what might be a very stressful time in their lives. Since they are already in learning mode this would be just a little “value added” to a well-rounded college education. (more…)

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